Dance Flurry, Review

I went to the Dance Flurry a couple of weeks ago (!) and I wanted to write a few notes here about the experience, and a little bit of reflection. I hope you'll spare me the indulgence. A year ago, I was pretty new to the East Coast: I didn't really know people, and while I'd been dancing for a while and I wasn't a bad dancer by any means, but I wasn't quite comfortable in my own skin in big dance events.…

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Git Sync

With the new laptop, I once again have more than one computer, and with it a need to synchronize the current state of my work. This is a crucial function, and pretty difficult to do right: I've had multiple systems before and condensed everything into one laptop because I didn't want to deal with the headache of sitting down in front of a computer and cursing the fact that the one thing that I needed to work on was stuck somewhere that I couldn't get to.…

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9 Awesome SSH Tricks

Sorry for the lame title. I was thinking the other day, about how awesome SSH is, and how it's probably one of the most crucial pieces of technology that I use every single day. Here's a list of 10 things that I think are particularly awesome and perhaps a bit off the beaten path. Update: (2011-09-19) There are some user-submitted ssh-tricks on the wiki now! Please feel free to add your favorites.…

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How Hacker News and Social Editing has Jumped the Shark

How's that for a Malcolm Gladwell-style subtitle title? Alex Payne posed a piece on why he thought that, basically Hacker News had jumped the shark. He's right, of course, but I think that his analysis of the root cause of the problem, and therefore the solution he proposes, is a bit too optimistic. It seems to me that all of these socially edited link-based blogs where lots of people submit links and then the community votes on these stories to generate headlines and a filtered and sorted selection of content based on the appetites of the communities.…

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Java and Me

Stan reminded me recently that I have now written two posts about the Java programing and software development. For something that I admittedly don't particularly care for, and don't know a great deal about I've sure ranted a lot about it. I think I keep returning to think about Java because of how incredibly important Java is to the technology we use and how prevalent Java development remains. Maybe I've read too much by Red Monk folks, but they tend take a very productive approach to these kinds of things.…

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Searching for Known Results

(Note: I was going through some old files earlier this week and found a couple of old posts that never made it into the live site. This is one of them. I've done a little bit of polishing around the edges, but this is as much a post for historical interest as is a reflection of the contemporary state of my thought.) This post is a follow up to my not much organization post, and as part of my general reorganization, I've been toying with anything for emacs which is a tool, or set of tools, which provide search-based interaction with some tasks (opening files, finding files, accessing other information, etc.…

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Anti-Social Media

I've been playing with this idea for a Critical Futures blog post for a few days, so you'll probably see this again at some point. Still, I wanted to pose a couple of questions that have been nagging at me for a while: Does the fact that we think of content as something that is becoming increasingly user generated, or generated outside of traditional professional structures, affect writers' ability to survive from an economic perspective?…

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