Philosophy of the Present, Egypt

I've been watching the Egyptian revolution, off and on since it started. There's so much interesting stuff going on: the pragmatics of political organization, the foundations of revolutionary movement, the evolving state of American political power, and the way that Egyptians are racialized particularly in contrast to Iranians and Tunisians. The aspect that I'm most interested is in what western analysis of "Janurary 25th" tells us about how the west has made sense of past revolutionary moments in the last '50 years notably the Iranian revolution and "May'68.…

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Caring about Java

I often find it difficult to feign interest the discussion of Java in the post Sun Microsystems era. Don't get me wrong, I get that there's a lot of Java out there, I get that there are a number of technological strengths and advantages that Java has in contrast some other programming platforms. Consider my post about worfism and computer programing for some background on my interest in programing languages and their use.…

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The Rise and Fall of Netbooks

"I'm old fashioned," R. said to me in an email, with that link to an article about how tablets have replaced and supplanted netbooks. In many ways, you have two netbooks: the little one that's been broken since may that I'm fixing and your real laptop. Which is to say: the advancement of netbooks was not, so much, the small form factor, but the fact that they were under powered computer systems meant to be used mostly with web-based applications.…

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Progressions

I've been somewhat remiss in posting here. Nevertheless, I've managed to get rather a lot of things done in the couple of weeks that I think merits an update post. I've posted two new things to Critical Futures, my final post--for now--about dexy, called make all dexy. and a post about new media on What we Learn from WikiLeaks. I've also updated the Critical Futures Archive, particularly the posts on technical writing series and the new media series.…

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What We Learn from Wikileaks

Wikileaks, and the drama that has surrounded it for the past few months, brings forth images of the Internet as a very lawless and juvenile place, exactly the kind of thing that the cyberpunks of the 1980s were predicting. This isn't always far from the truth, but the story of spies and international espionage, and digital attacks and counter attacks may distract us from thinking about other issues. Obviously Wikileaks causes us think about censorship, but issue of publishing, journalism, audience and community participation, transparency, and globalism in the digital context are also at play.…

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Learning Python

I'm not a programmer. I find myself saying this with great frequency. Which is weird, because I end up writing a fair amount of content that looks like (and probably is) code. Almost always this takes the forms of little shell scripts that do the things that I would other wise have to do by hand. Very early on in my development as a programmer and Linux user, bear told me that the greatest thing about the shell was that once you figured something out, you could save it and reuse it whenever you needed it, and you never had to figure out that thing again.…

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:author: tychoish

Eventually, the Facebooks and Twitters of the world may be dethroned and replaced by provider-agnostic protocols, in much the same way AOL is no longer synonymous with email. However, no one is going to build protocols that threaten their bottom line. So long as "free" is paid for by surveillance, the Internet will represent a Faustian bargain for radical social movements. -- The Price of Free…