Revolutionary Communities

I began to get to this in my post on health care and cooperatives, and governmental reform but I think it's important to get to this point in its own post. I guess what I've been gunning at (whether or not I realized it) is, "the shape of social/political change" in the contemporary world. What does change look like? What mechanisms can we use to create change? How do the existing ways that we think of revolutionary change fail to address the world we live in?…

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Free Software Misunderstood

This post is in response to two things that I've observed recently: 1. A Misinformed Critique of the Debian Project 2. The largely unfair dismissal of free software/open source/hackers on the grounds of purported zealotry. Debian, Critiqued The above linked article, presents a number of critiques, leveled at the Debian project. While these complaints with user experience are valid, I was left with a serious, as we say on the Internet "WTF" moment.…

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health care co-operatives

This is I think part of a "phase two" of a series of articles I wrote a few months ago about political economies, about corporate structures, about "hacker centric" business models. In that vein of thought, I suppose this post was inevitable. My argument, in "phase one" was that big "corporations" were poorly constituted to develop sustainable business models, to act in the public interest, and to further the best interests of their employees and customers.…

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Where Innovation Happens, Part Two

In my post against the venture capital model I think one key question that I think I failed to answer is "If we do away with venture capital, where does innovation happen?" This post locates a number of potentials answers to this question. 1. Innovation happens in academia and research-oriented institutions. This is where innovation has often happened, and it makes sense: you get smart driven people together and you give them resources and you say learn about the world, and see what new things you can make and think that haven't been made and thought of before.…

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venture capital and software

I read this article by Joel Spoolsky about the first dot-com bust and it help crystallized a series of thoughts about the role of venture capital in the development of technology and software, particularly of Internet technologies. Give it a shot. Also, I think Cory Doctorow's "Other People's Money," is a helpful contributor to this train of thought. The question I find myself asking myself is: to what extent is the current development of technology--particularly networked technology--shaped by the demands of the venture capital market?…

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Blogging Forms

One of the aspects of "BloggingFail" [1] during the most recent technology/new media bubble, is the emergence of "blog post formulas," which are basic post formats that people use to provide structure to a post, and produce content in a way that's more readable for casual visitors, and better for search engines. Interestingly, not all of these formats are as bad as the BlogFail that they helped create, and I've been interested in collecting/creating a few new and different formats for blog posts.…

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On Reading and Writing

I may be a huge geek and a hacker type, but I'm a writer and reader first, and although while I'm blathering on about my setup it might seem like all I do is tweak my systems, the writing and reading are really more "my thing." I wrote that sentence a few weeks ago, and I've written a great many more sentences since then, but I've felt that that sentence needs some more exploration, particularly because while it seems so obvious and integrated into what I do from behind the keyboard, I think it bares some explanation for those of you playing along at home.…

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