technology as infrastructure, act three

Continued from, Technology as Infrastructure, Act Two. Act Three All my discussions of "technology as infrastructure" thus far have been fairly high level. Discussions of particular business strategies of major players (eg. google and amazon), discussions approaches to "the cloud," and so forth. As is my way, however, I've noticed that the obvious missing piece of this puzzle is how users--like you and me--are going to use the cloud. How thinking about technology as infrastructure changes the way we interact with our technology, and other related issues.…

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technology as infrastructure, act two

Continued from, Technology as Infrastructure, Act One. Act Two Cnet's Matt Assay covering this post by RedMonk's Stephen O'Grady suggests that an "open source cloud" is unlikely because superstructure (hardware/concrete power) matters more than infrastructure (software)--though in IT "infrastructure" means something different, so go read Stephen's article. It's my understanding that, in a manner of speaking, open source has already "won" this game. Though google's code is proprietary, it runs on a Linux/java-script/python platform.…

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technology as infrastructure, act one

This post is inspired by three converging observations: 1. Matt posted a comment to a previous post: that read: "Cloud" computing. Seriously. Do we really want to give up that much control over our computing? In the dystopian future celebrated by many tech bloggers, computers will be locked down appliances, and we will rely on big companies to deliver services to us. 2. A number of podcasts that I listened to while I drove to New Jersey produced/hosted/etc.…

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on public key encryption and security

As part of the moving process I got a bank account, and I was reminded, again, of how much the security systems of most online banks are comically flawed, which lead me to even greater anger about security in general. The following rant is what happened. I should say at first, that I'm not really a security expert, and I just dabble in this stuff. Having said that... "Security" online and in a digital context covers two pretty distinct aspects:…

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on package management

I was writing my post on distribution habits and change, and I realized that I some elaboration on the concept of package management was probably in order. This is that elaboration. Most linux--and indeed UNIX, at this point--systems have some kind of package management: Rather than provide an operating as one-monolithic and unchanging set of files, distributions with package management provide systems with some sort of database, and common binary file format that allows users to install (and install) all software in a clear/standardized/common manner.…

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why arch linux rocks

So, long story short, I've been working a lot with ArchLinux in the last few days, getting it setup, and starting to use this peculiar little distribution. While I will surely be blogging more about Arch in the coming days, I think a brief list of first impressions are in order. I share values with the Arch Developers. This is, I think, a factor of "choosing a Linux (or BSD) distribution" that is really hard to understand or explain.…

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distribution habits and change

Here's another one for the "new workstation series." Until now my linux-usage has been very Debian based. It's good, it's stable, and the package management system is really intensely wonderful. I was happy. And then I was somewhat less happy. Ubuntu--the distribution that I'd been using on my desktop. Don't get me wrong, Ubuntu is great and I'd gladly recommend it to other people, but... with time, I've found that the system feels clunky.…

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