Progressions

I've been somewhat remiss in posting here. Nevertheless, I've managed to get rather a lot of things done in the couple of weeks that I think merits an update post. I've posted two new things to Critical Futures, my final post--for now--about dexy, called make all dexy. and a post about new media on What we Learn from WikiLeaks. I've also updated the Critical Futures Archive, particularly the posts on technical writing series and the new media series.…

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What We Learn from Wikileaks

Wikileaks, and the drama that has surrounded it for the past few months, brings forth images of the Internet as a very lawless and juvenile place, exactly the kind of thing that the cyberpunks of the 1980s were predicting. This isn't always far from the truth, but the story of spies and international espionage, and digital attacks and counter attacks may distract us from thinking about other issues. Obviously Wikileaks causes us think about censorship, but issue of publishing, journalism, audience and community participation, transparency, and globalism in the digital context are also at play.…

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Learning Python

I'm not a programmer. I find myself saying this with great frequency. Which is weird, because I end up writing a fair amount of content that looks like (and probably is) code. Almost always this takes the forms of little shell scripts that do the things that I would other wise have to do by hand. Very early on in my development as a programmer and Linux user, bear told me that the greatest thing about the shell was that once you figured something out, you could save it and reuse it whenever you needed it, and you never had to figure out that thing again.…

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:author: tychoish

The Price of Free Eventually, the Facebooks and Twitters of the world may be dethroned and replaced by provider-agnostic protocols, in much the same way AOL is no longer synonymous with email. However, no one is going to build protocols that threaten their bottom line. So long as "free" is paid for by surveillance, the Internet will represent a Faustian bargain for radical social movements. -- The Price of Free…

The Ones that Stop at North Broad

There's something about public transit, particularly train systems, that seeps into the riders. Little facts that make getting around easier. "You're waiting for the R3? It's always late," they'll say, or they'll be able to tell you which stop is next by looking out the window in what looks like total blackness. Routines do that to you, I guess. I was on a train last week, not my usual evening train--which is a short turned local train that ends one stop past mine--that only has two intermediate stops before my stop, and as we were getting of the train, a group of regular shad a conversation that resembled the following.…

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Creature of Habit

I'm doing my commute somewhat differently this morning. Same wake time, same destination, and many of the same trains, but a special event necessitated a different pattern. It's amazing how much this shift has thrown me out of sync with my day. Not in a bad way, but in the way that I was sort of jittery about missing my train in a way that my normal patter has really ceased to evoke.…

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git readd and git aliases

git is a version control system that does a number of things rather "differently." By now, I suspect most people are familiar with git so I will refrain from focusing too much time here on explaining what git is or how it works. Git does things differently, and to make a long story short, git has no concept of a file rename. To be honest git doesn't have a lot of sense of individual files at all, but that's another story.…

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