Why Bother With Lisp?

I'm quite fond of saying "I'm not a programmer or software developer," on this blog, and while I don't think that there's a great chance that I'll be employed as a developer, it's becoming more apparent that the real difference between me and a "real developer" is vanishingly small. Stealth Developer, or something. In any case, my ongoing tooling around with common lisp and more recently the tumble manager project have given me opportunities to think about lisp and to think about why I enjoy it.…

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Where is Java Today?

A few weeks ago a coworker walked into my office to talk about the architecture of a project, complete with diagrams, numbers I didn't grasp (nor really need to,) and the examples of potential off the shelf components that would make up the stack of the application at hand. I asked scores of questions and I think it was a productive encounter. Normal day, really. I seem to be the guy developers come to and pitch ideas to for feedback.…

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Things I'm Wiking On

The Contra Purity Test: A couple friends and thought it might be cool to work on a "purity test" for contra dancing/dancers. Mostly for jokes, I said "I'll make a wiki page," and then I did. It is, I'd say 70% done. Some writing and thinking about TumbleManager, tumblelog engine in response to this post. I'm writing this as a design document/spec sheet because I'm a writer and my brain works like this.…

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Input in the Next Wave

In response mostly to my own comentary of the iPad I'd like to lead a collective brainstorming of input and computer interact modalities in "the next wave." What's the next wave? That thing that's always coming "soon," but isn't quite here yet, the thing that we are starting to see glimpses of, but don't really know. Accepting for a moment that things like Blackberries, netbooks, Kindles, iPads, iPhones and the like are these "harbingers" of the next wave.…

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If Open Source is Big Business Then Whither the Community?

I've been thinking recently about the relationship and dynamic between the corporations and "enterprises" which participate in and reap benefits from open source/free software and the quasi-mythic "communities" that are responsible for the creation and maintenance of the software. Additionally this post may be considered part of my ongoing series on cooperative economics. When people, ranging from business types, to IT professionals, to programmers, and beyond, talk about open source software we talk about a community: often small to medium sized groups of people who all contribute small amounts of time to creating software.…

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Conceptualizing Scale

I've been thinking about how ideas, projects, and ideas scale a bit in the past few weeks, and as usual, I wanted to collect a few of these thoughts. This post is generally in my series of posts of "Extrapolations from Systems Administration." Inspirations and origins of these ideas come from, in part: My Tumblr Killed the Tumblelog Star post. My Google reader unread count. Savage Minds Post on Social Enterpernurship and Anthropology post.…

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Distance from the Divine

When I talk about Sacred Harp singing with my friends from college, they all look at me like I'm crazy. "Right, I go sing 18th century hymns set to music in the 19th century (and later,) with my hippie and queer friends in quasi-archaic harmonies. It's a blast!" This isn't my tradition, both in the sense that I don't come from a sacred harp singing family, and in the sense that I come from a particularly unobservant Jewish family.…

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