stars in my torchwood pocket

Two things on the agenda. First, the third "season" of the BBC science fiction show Torchwood, which I have recently completed. Second, Samuel R. Delany's novel "Stars in my Pocket like Grains of Sand," which I am two-thirds of the way through. Act One: Torchwood I'm a huge fan of torchwood. It's quirky, it's fun, its easy to connect with the characters, and then there's the Ianto/Jack relationship, which is handled amazingly throughout the entire story.…

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The Blog is Dead, Long Live the (micro)Blog

"I'm giving up blogging because twitter has more energy and satisfies my online media needs these days." I here yet another person say, as they give up the blog that they've been working on sporadically for the last 4 or five years for a twitter account. I'm certainly not giving up blogging any time soon, but I hear people say these things. Not always so explicitly, and less often now that twitter has become more established, and less of a novelty.…

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are web standards broken

When I started doing this website thing on the eve of the millennium, the burgening buzzword of the time was "web standards." All of us in the know were working on learning and then writing to web standards like HTML 4.0 and eventually XHTML 1.0 along with CSS 1 and 2. And we were all hankering for browsers that implemented these standards in a consistent way. Really all we wanted was for our web pages to look the same no matter who was viewing the page.…

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infrastructural commerce

I think I've touched on this question before but with the last technology as infrastructure post it seems like another opportunity to talk about the intersections between this topic--thinking about technology as infrastructure--and about the sort of small scale/cooperative economics that I was writing a lot about a couple of months back. The question on my mind at the moment is, "What do the business models of technology firms look like, in a software-freedom-loving, non-corporate/cooperative-business way?…

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technology as infrastructure, act three

Continued from, Technology as Infrastructure, Act Two. Act Three All my discussions of "technology as infrastructure" thus far have been fairly high level. Discussions of particular business strategies of major players (eg. google and amazon), discussions approaches to "the cloud," and so forth. As is my way, however, I've noticed that the obvious missing piece of this puzzle is how users--like you and me--are going to use the cloud. How thinking about technology as infrastructure changes the way we interact with our technology, and other related issues.…

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technology as infrastructure, act two

Continued from, Technology as Infrastructure, Act One. Act Two Cnet's Matt Assay covering this post by RedMonk's Stephen O'Grady suggests that an "open source cloud" is unlikely because superstructure (hardware/concrete power) matters more than infrastructure (software)--though in IT "infrastructure" means something different, so go read Stephen's article. It's my understanding that, in a manner of speaking, open source has already "won" this game. Though google's code is proprietary, it runs on a Linux/java-script/python platform.…

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technology as infrastructure, act one

Act One This post is inspired by three converging observations: 1. Matt posted a comment to a previous post: that read: "Cloud" computing. Seriously. Do we really want to give up that much control over our computing? In the dystopian future celebrated by many tech bloggers, computers will be locked down appliances, and we will rely on big companies to deliver services to us. 2. A number of podcasts that I listened to while I drove to New Jersey produced/hosted/etc.…

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