The Cathedral and the Bazaar Today

Just about everyone who spends any time studying open source is familiar with Eric S. Raymond's "[The Cathedral and the Bazaar] (http://www.catb.org/~esr/writings/cathedral-bazaar/cathedral-bazaar/index.html#catbmain)." So familiar that both are generally known by abbreviations: esr and CatB respectively. To recap, it was a ground breaking essay written in the mid nineties that really drew attention to how novel the development of the Linux Kernel really was, and outlined a number of powerful "open" development practices that--because of the Internet--changed the way that the open source was able to function.…

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A Cowl--(Knittting)

So rather than approach my knitting posts for tychoish like a guilty journal (eg. I haven't knit in a week, but I did yesterday and it's cool, here's my progress,) I'm going to just talk about projects that I'm working on and knitting ideas that I have. Because I have a lot of them, and I think maybe approaching knitting topics in a more granular way might be fun. And it'll give all the techie folks a sense of how all my--rapidly decreasing--knitting readership feel most of the time.…

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Keeping Time with tycho

Ok, so I haven't done a journal upate in a long time, and I think it's high time that I posted an update about my projects and stuff. It's my blog after all. I've been working a lot, which is a good thing. Also I think some pretty cool things are happening with my job. While work can be stressful by virtue of shear volume, I'm pretty excited about how things are going.…

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A Day's Work

I did some blog writing for the upcoming week today. It was good, I managed to pull off nearly two weeks the last time I sat down and seriously wrote for the blog, so I haven't had the chance to really sort through thoughts like this in a long time. It's amazing how much writing blog posts provides me the space to work through things that I'm thinking about. It's also amazing to me how much I've grown to depend and expect this space as part of my life, and how scattered my thinking is without this blog.…

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New Geeks

I've for some number of months started to recognize a division between what I've been thinking of as "new" and "old" guard geeks in the open source world. The old guard have been the linux and hardware hacker-type people who are prone to say "GNU/Linux" and "free software" or conversely be interested in BSD. These are people who care about plain text files and get really invested text editors and data formats and stuff like that.…

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Where Innovation Happens, Part One

Two of the most interesting/innovating/exciting open source projects that I've watched in the last little while are "git," the distributed source control management tool, and "Awesome," a very... niche window management program for Linux. When most people think about open source they probably think about something like the GNOME, or Firefox, or to a lesser extent Pidgin. These second group of programs are the big projects that lots of people pat attention to, projects that are targeted at non-developer users.…

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Productivity Blogging and Effectiveness

For the past few years I've had a productivity tag to organize/centralize all of the thinking and writing I've been doing on topics related to how we work. User experience stuff and technology, work-flow management and design, "life hacks," stuff about the processes of writing, and so forth. The truth is that the "productivity" blogging niche is pretty big. LifeHacker, 43Folders, and many other smaller blogs seem to address these issues with a greater attention to detail than I am able to muster.…

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